Exercises

Here are all the exercises on the site so far. They are arranged in alphabetical order. I am constantly adding new exercises, so check back often.

Have fun!

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(Not so) Quick Quiz

This quiz has a mixture of categories including phrasal verbs, vocabulary, idioms, prepositions, and more. There are 31 questions.

Adjective + Preposition (ABOUT)

 In English, certain adjectives are commonly followed by specific prepositions to express various relationships, attitudes, and qualities. In this exercise, we’ll focus on prepositions that are followed by the preposition about. VIEW THE EXPLANATION HERE.

Adjective + Preposition (FOR)

In English, certain adjectives are commonly followed by specific prepositions to express various relationships, attitudes, and qualities. In this exercise, we’ll focus on prepositions that are followed by the preposition for. VIEW THE EXPLANATION HERE.

Adjective + Preposition (OF)

In English, certain adjectives are commonly followed by specific prepositions to express various relationships, attitudes, and qualities. In this exercise, we’ll focus on prepositions that are followed by the preposition of.  VIEW THE EXPLANATION HERE.

Adjective + Preposition (TO)

In English, certain adjectives are commonly followed by specific prepositions to express various relationships, attitudes, and qualities. In this exercise, we’ll focus on prepositions that are followed by the preposition to. VIEW THE EXPLANATION HERE.

Adverbs

An adverb is a word that modifies or describes a verb, adjective, or another adverb, providing more information about how, when, where, to what extent, or how often something happens. For example, in the sentence “She sings beautifully,” the adverb “beautifully” describes how she sings. VIEW THE EXPLANATION HERE.

Adverbs of Frequency

Adverbs of frequency might seem small, but they’re really helpful! They tell us how often things happen, which is important for clear communication. Test you knowledge with our interactive quiz. VIEW THE EXPLANATION HERE.

Articles & Determiners

Here is a 12-question multiple-choice exercise based on the material from the provided webpage on Articles and Determiners.

Because vs. Because of

What’s the difference between “because” and “because of”? In most cases, “because” is followed by a subject and a verb, and “because of” is typically followed by a single word or phrase. Here are two sentences with similar meanings, but with different structures to help illustrate this difference: “The concert was canceled because the weather was bad.”“The …

Beside vs. Besides

Use “beside” when referring to physical proximity or location.Use “besides” when adding information or expressing an additional point.

Business Terms

Test your knowledge of business terms that cover various aspects of business operations, finance, management, and economics.  VIEW THE EXPLANATION HERE.

Collocations – Nouns + Prepositions

Collocations are words that often go together, and mastering them can make your English sound more natural and fluent. Here’s a fun exercise to get you started: VIEW THE EXPLANATION HERE.

Comparative and Superlative Adjectives

Comparatives and superlatives are special adjectives that compare two (comparatives) or more (superlatives) things. Most comparatives are formed by adding -er to an adjective, and most superlatives are formed by adding -est. Superlatives are usually preceded by the (the fastest). VIEW THE EXPLANATION HERE.

Conditional 0 – The ZERO Conditional

We use the zero conditional when we want to talk about facts or things that are generally true. FORM:If/when + simple present, simple present (or imperative).Simple present if/when simple present. VIEW THE EXPLANATION HERE.

Conditional 1 – The FIRST Conditional

We use the first conditional when we want to describe a situation that is true if the condition is true. FORM:If + simple present, future w/will + complementFuture w/will + complement if + simple present VIEW THE EXPLANATION HERE.

Conditional 2- The SECOND Conditional

The second conditional is a structure used to talk about impossible, imaginary, or extremely unlikely situations. If+past simple, would+infinitive + complementWould+infinitive + complement if+past simple VIEW THE EXPLANATION HERE.

Conditional 3 – The THIRD Conditional

The third conditional is used to talk about hypothetical or unreal situations in the past and their hypothetical results. (if clause in past perfect, main clause in would have + past participle) VIEW THE EXPLANATION HERE.

Conjunctions

Conjunctions are essential parts of speech in English, connecting words, phrases, or clauses within a sentence. For ESL learners, understanding conjunctions is crucial for constructing clear and cohesive sentences. Conjunctions can be categorized into different types, each serving a specific purpose in expressing relationships between ideas. VIEW THE EXPLANATION HERE.

Countable and Uncountable Nouns

Countable nouns have both singular and plural forms. Uncountable nouns refer to substances, concepts, or qualities that cannot be counted as individual units and don’t have a plural form or can’t be pluralized without changing their meaning. VIEW THE EXPLANATION HERE.

Days of the Week

How well do you know the days of the week? Take this quiz and find out. VIEW THE EXPLANATION HERE.

DO vs DOES

DO is a verb and DOES is the third person singular of that verb in the present tense. VIEW THE EXPLANATION HERE.

Except or Except for

You can use EXCEPT FOR when you want to show that the statement in the main part of the sentence is not completely true:My vacation was great, EXCEPT FOR the rain. (So, not completely great because of the rain).I finished cleaning the whole house, EXCEPT FOR the bedrooms. (So, I didn’t completely clean.)We drank all …

Indirect Questions

Indirect questions are a polite and often more formal way of asking questions. They differ from direct questions in their structure and use. Indirect questions are questions embedded within statements or other questions. They are commonly used to show politeness or to soften the impact of a question. Instead of asking a question directly, you …

Irregular Verbs

In English grammar, verbs are categorized as either regular or irregular based on how they form their past tense and past participle. While regular verbs follow a standard pattern (adding “-ed” to form the past tense and past participle), irregular verbs have unique forms that do not follow this pattern. VIEW THE EXPLANATION HERE.

Keyboard Characters and Punctuation Marks

These characters are not just random symbols; they play a crucial role in writing, coding, and communication.  Test you knowledge below. VIEW THE EXPLANATION HERE.

Maybe or May Be

Maybe is an adverb while may be is a verb. To learn more, click here.

Order of Adjectives

When multiple adjectives are used to describe a noun, they usually follow a specific order.  If you’d like to refresh your memory, click here.

Parts of Speech

English is made up of many different types of words. We refer to these types of words as parts of speech. Some words can be used in more than one way depending on the sentence they are in. The main parts of speech are nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, pronouns, prepositions, interjections, articles, determiners,  and conjunctions. VIEW …

Personal Pronouns & Adjectives

Subject pronouns, possessive adjectives, object pronouns, possessive pronouns, and reflexive pronouns. VIEW THE EXPLANATION HERE.

Phrasal Verbs

A phrasal verb combines a verb and one or more particles (such as adverbs or prepositions) that convey a meaning different from the individual meanings of its components. How well do you know your phrasal verbs? VIEW THE EXPLANATION HERE.

Possessive Adjectives vs. Possessive Pronouns

Possessive adjectives are used before nouns to show possession.Possessive pronouns stand-alone and replace nouns to show possession. VIEW THE EXPLANATION HERE.

Prefixes

Prefixes are attached to the beginning of words to alter their meanings. If you’d like a reminder of what they are and how we use them, click here.

Prepositions

How well do you know your prepositions? Take this quiz and find out.

Prepositions of Location

In this exercise, we’ll focus specifically on prepositions of location, which tell us where an object is positioned in space. These prepositions help us describe the spatial relationships between objects and places. Before we jump into the exercise, let’s review some common prepositions of location: Now that we’ve refreshed our understanding of these prepositions, it’s …

Prepositions of Time – in, on, at

Here are 12 multiple-choice questions to test your knowledge of the prepositions of time: in, on, and at. VIEW THE EXPLANATION HERE.

Pronunciation – The TH Sound

English pronunciation can be tricky, especially when it comes to sounds like the TH sound. How well do you know your TH sounds? VIEW THE EXPLANATION HERE.

Pronunciation of the “-s/-es” sound

In English, verbs change when referring to different subjects. This page focuses on the third person singular, where the verb often takes on the “-s” or “-es” ending in the present tense.  If you’d like a reminder of the rules, click here.

Pronunciation of the ED sound

The way we pronounce the “-ed” ending can vary depending on the preceding sound. For a reminder of the rules, click here.

Reading Comprehension

In this section, you can find some short stories accompanied by a comprehension exercise.

Remember vs. Remind

“Remember” is about your own memory, recalling information independently. “Remind” involves assisting or being prompted to recall something.  VIEW THE EXPLANATION HERE.

Rob vs Steal

Rob and steal both mean ‘take something from someone without permission’. Rob focuses on the place or person from which the thing is taken. Steal focuses on the thing that is taken.

Sometime, Sometimes and Some Time

These three words are often confused.  If you’d like a reminder before you do the exercise, click here.

Spelling: The Simple Past

Regular verbs follow specific spelling rules when conjugated into the simple past tense. If you’d like a reminder, click here.

Stative or Dynamic Verbs

Verbs in English can be categorized into two main types: stative (or state) verbs and dynamic (or action) verbs. Test your understanding of the difference between these verb types in this interactive quiz. VIEW THE EXPLANATION HERE.

Suffixes

Suffixes are linguistic elements appended to the end of a word to modify its meaning or function. If you need a reminder about suffixes, click here.

Tag Questions

Tag questions are short questions added to the end of a statement to invite confirmation, agreement, or disagreement. They typically consist of an auxiliary verb followed by a pronoun, matching the subject of the statement, and are used to seek validation or confirmation of the preceding statement.

Test Your Grammar

This is a short high-intermediate level quiz. Can you pass?

Test Your Vocabulary

This quiz has vocabulary and idiomatic expressions.There are 18 questions.

The modal WOULD

In this exercise, we’ll explore your knowledge of “would”, with its various meanings, functions, and usage in everyday language. VIEW THE EXPLANATION HERE.

The Passive Voice

The passive voice is a grammatical construction where the subject of a sentence is the recipient of the action rather than the doer. In other words, the focus is on what is being done to the subject rather than who is doing it. If you’d like some more information, click here.

The Simple Present Tense

Do you know how to conjugate the simple present tense? Do you know when we use it? If you’re not sure, click here.

The Verb TO BE

The verb “to be” is fundamental in learning English. This verb is special because it helps us describe and identify things. We use ‘to be’ to talk about who or what someone is, where someone is from, and even how someone feels. Understanding this verb will help us form basic sentences and have simple conversations. …

USED TO vs BE USED TO

“Used to” refers to past habits or situations that are no longer true in the present.“Be used to” refers to the state of being familiar or accustomed to something in the present. For more information, click here.

Verb Tenses

How well do you know your verb tenses? Take this quiz and find out.

Vocabulary

Language Practice – In each sentence in this exercise, there is a word that is bold and underlined. Choose the alternative that best explains the meaning of that word.

Who, Whom, or Whose?

These words are often confused. If you’d like a reminder of how they work, click here.