Category: VOCABULARY

GRAMMAR – COMMON CONTRACTIONS

GRAMMAR – COMMON CONTRACTIONS We use contractions (I’m, we’re) in everyday speech and informal writing. Contractions, which are sometimes called ‘short forms’, commonly combine a pronoun or noun and a verb, or a verb and not, in a shorter form. Contractions are usually not appropriate in formal writing. We make contractions with auxiliary verbs, and …

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VOCABULARY – Internet Abbreviations (with definitions)

VOCABULARY – Internet Abbreviations (with definitions) Our social media shorthand is amazingly extensive. We have acronyms and abbreviations for the way that we chat back and forth with one another. Here are some that seem to appear quite often. AFAIK – As far as I know b/c, bc – Because B4 – Before BAE – …

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VOCABULARY – Irregular Plural Nouns

VOCABULARY – Irregular Plural Nouns Most nouns in English are made plural by adding an ‘s’ to the singular form. But there are some exceptions. Here are a few of the more common ones. The plural of person is people. The plural of foot is feet. The plural of tooth is teeth. The plural of …

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What’s the difference between WHOSE and WHO’S

GRAMMAR – WHOSE vs WHO IS WHOSE is a possessive pronoun that asks to whom something belongs. WHO’S is a contraction of who+is or who+has. BE CAREFUL because they sound exactly the same. [hooz] The easiest way to tell them apart is to look for the verb. If you cannot find a verb then it …

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VOCABULARY – Informal (spoken) Contractions

VOCABULARY – Informal (spoken) Contractions In English, as in most other languages, there are ways to shorten groups of words that commonly go together. We don’t do this in writing, just when we speak. They are called informal or spoken contractions. Here are some examples: I’ve got to go soon – I’ve gotta go soon. …

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